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Developmental Writing and the College-level Writing Requirements

The Developmental Writing Program consists of a series of courses that fulfill the "pre-college" writing requirement. These courses are calibrated for students new to the university and are intended to provide instruction in the writing skills required for success as a college-level writer.

Developmental Writing Courses

Academic Writing 1 (WRIT 1), offered fall semester

WRIT 1 is a 2-unit course that will include approximately 4,000 words of edited composition.  During the semester, students will accrue points on essays, assignments, class work and research projects.  Students will engage in higher-level reading and writing skills for university transition. The course focuses on academic expository writing and covers the essay writing process, note taking, outlining, summarizing, and editing.  It also focuses on development of vocabulary, comprehension, concentration, memory and fluency skills.  Critical thinking, analysis and evaluation are emphasized as students engage with themed materials.  Students will develop research skills in the use of outside reference materials including locating and evaluating sources and properly documenting source information.  Students are expected to progress in a variety of academic writing forms including but not limited to reports, short term papers, essays and journal writing, incorporating increasingly complex rhetoric. 

This course is part of a sequence designed for those students who need to meet the university fundamental skills requirement.  Pre-requisites for placement are determined by qualifying standardized or diagnostic test scores. Pass/No credit (P/NC) grading option is not allowed for this course. Students taking this course are required to take WRIT 2 the following semester and must earn a C- or better to be eligible for advancement.

Academic Writing 2 (WRIT 2), offered spring semester

WRIT 2 is a two-unit course that will include approximately 4,000 words of edited composition.  Students will develop advanced writing projects as they locate, evaluate, and synthesize source material from various disciplines and compose research papers using APA, MLA, CMS and CSE documentation as needed.  Special emphasis is placed on the skills related to vocabulary development, critical thinking and interpretation of scholarly material for the purpose of in-class discussions, expository writing assignments and literary analysis.

This course is part of a sequence designed for those students who need to meet the university fundamental skills requirement.  Placement is determined by successful completion of WRIT 1, which is a pre-requisite for this course. Pass/No credit (P/NC) grading option is not allowed for this course. Students taking this course are required to take PACS Plus in the upcoming fall semester and must earn a C- or better to be eligible for advancement.

Accelerated Academic Writing (WRIT 10), offered fall and spring semesters

WRIT 10 is a two-unit course intended for students who need to fulfill the university's fundamental skills requirement in writing but are exempt from taking Pacific Seminars 1 and 2. This course will include approximately 5,000 words of edited composition.  Students will develop advanced writing projects as they develop strong written communication skills, critical thinking, and reading skills necessary for success in their majors and will engage in information literacy by locating, evaluating, and synthesizing source material from various disciplines.  Students will also learn how to appropriately document papers, using APA, MLA, CMS and CSE citation styles as needed.

Placement is determined by standardized or diagnostic test scores.  Pass/No credit (P/NC) grading option is not allowed for this course.  A grade of C- or better is required to satisfy the university's fundamental skills requirement in writing.  Prerequisites: 28 college-level units (or more).

Pacific Seminar 1 Plus (PACS 001P), requires concurrent enrollment with PACS 1, fall semester

Pacific Seminar 1 Plus (PACS 001P) is a 2-unit course designed to supplement the PACS 1 class.  The supplemental weekly writing studio provides additional support to help students be successful in writing PACS essays and make students stronger writers overall.  Work in the studios builds on the reading and discussion work of PACS 1.   At the same time, students will reflect on how the writing skills can be generalized to future writing tasks in other classes.  Attendance is required and is subject to the attendance policy outlined in this syllabus.  Studio topics reflect the stages of the writing process as you complete your PACS 1 formal-writing assignments. Studio time may be dedicated to such things as writing workshops, discussions, informal writing prompts, individual and small-group conferences with the instructor, and other activities related to your development as a writer. Specific topics and activities are at the discretion of the instructor.

Placement is determined by standardized or diagnostic test scores.  Pass/No credit (P/NC) grading option is not allowed for this course. 

College-level Writing Courses

Pacific Seminar 1 (PACS 1), offered fall semester

Pacific Seminar 1 (PACS 1) introduces students to the intellectual life of the university by exploring the intersection of who we are as individuals and who we are as communities. The course engages the critical tension between individual rights and social responsibilities as that tension manifests in issues such as identity, equality, and sustainability, among others. PACS I is a shared intellectual experience, incorporating materials from the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. Students meet in small sections to discuss the readings and issues and develop their reading, writing, and critical thinking skills. PACS 1 develops skills students will need to succeed in any field of study at the University and beyond. The course represents an introduction to general education in the best sense of the term: education for self-examination and engaged citizenship. Such grounding will help students develop the agency and flexibility necessary to navigate a rapidly changing political, social, and economic environment.

PACS 1 fulfills part one of the University's College Level Writing Requirement.  It requires at least 6,000-7,000 words of edited composition. Placement is determined by standardized or diagnostic test scores.  Pass/No credit (P/NC) grading option is not allowed for this course.  A grade of D or better is required to satisfy this portion of the university's writing requirement. 

Pacific Seminar 2 (PACS 2), offered spring semester

Pacific Seminar 2 (PACS 2) is offered each spring, and should be understood by students and faculty as an extension of PACS 1. In PACS 2, students choose from over forty different seminars, each of which has its own topical focus, but all of which examine in detail some aspect or facet of a good society. These multidisciplinary seminars are offered by faculty from every school (on the Stockton campus) and virtually every department in the College of the Pacific.

PACS 2 constitutes the second part of the University's College Level Writing Requirement, and the signature assignment is a scholarly research project. Although each instructor develops specific paper guidelines, research projects develop general, and not discipline-specific, research and writing skills. Each student will produce at least 6,000 words of formal writing, due at multiple points in time during the semester.  Informal writing is also a regular part of PACS 2. A grade of D or better is required to satisfy this portion of the university's writing requirement.  [Pre-requisite: PACS 1]

Pacific Seminar 3 (PACS 3), offered fall, spring, and summer

Pacific Seminar 3 (PACS 3) is the culminating course in the General Education core sequence and the upper-division writing requirement. In their senior year, students from all majors mix together again to develop their capacities for ethical self-understanding and ethical reasoning about theoretical and applied ethical issues. The centerpiece assignment is the students' own ethical autobiography; other writing might include ethical analyses of case studies and of film .

PACS 3 fulfills part three of the University's College Level Writing Requirement.  It requires approximately 6,000-7,000 words of edited composition. Pass/No credit (P/NC) grading option is not allowed for this course.  A grade of D or better is required to satisfy this requirement.  [Pre-requisite: 92 units or more]

For more information regarding writing placement, please click here.

Developmental Writing Instructors

Scott EvansScott Evans

Instructor

sevans@pacific.edu

Scott Evans holds a Master's in English from the University of California, Davis, and has taught at the University of the Pacific since 1987, including fundamental skills writing courses, fiction writing and a course titled "Crime, Punishment and Justice" that introduces first-year students to criminology from various perspectives.  He is also the author of a series of literary-themed murder mysteries and is editor and publisher of the Blue Moon Literary & Art Review.  He has published numerous stories and poems, as well as newspaper articles, and was the recipient of the National Endowment for the Humanities Lectureship in Southern Literature in Louisiana in 1985.  

John AllenJohn Allen

Instructor

jallen@pacific.edu

 

John Allen is an alumnus of University of the Pacific (class of 2004) where he majored in English and minored in philosophy.  Before returning to Pacific to teach in 2011, he earned an MA in Humanities and Social Thought studying philosophy of language and literary theory at New York University.  Some of his favorite authors are Jane Austen, Virginia Woolf, Walter Benjamin, and Samuel Beckett.  In his spare time he enjoys reading and thinking about the nature of language, its social and structural dimensions, and writing poems and short stories.