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    Actor and Author Hill Harper is Keynote Speaker for Pacific’s Black History Month Celebration

    Jan 26, 2011

    Hill Harper, actor, motivational speaker and author of New York Times best-selling books aimed at inspiring black youth, will be this year's keynote speaker for University of the Pacific's Black History Month celebration.

    Hill HarperHarper will speak on Saturday, Feb. 26 in the Faye Spanos Concert Hall on Pacific's Stockton campus. The lecture starts at 8 p.m. (doors open at 7 p.m.). It is free and open to the public though seating is limited and available on a first-come, first-served basis. Shortly before the lecture, winners of Pacific's Apollo Night competition will perform.

    Pacific's month-long celebration of black heritage and history is designed to both educate and enrich the campus and local communities. Harper's lecture, "Building a Foundation for Your Life," is one of many events planned throughout February. Other activities include roundtable discussions, a film series, college and financial aid workshop, heritage fair and poetry reading by Camille Dungy, an African-American poet who delves into the historical experiences of blacks, from slavery to the present day.

    "This annual celebration of black heritage not only serves to educate the student body and the public, it also helps to form a stronger connection between Pacific, our alumni and the Stockton community," said Lisa Cooper, assistant vice president for Diversity and Community Engagement. "Hill Harper speaks powerfully and eloquently to audiences across the country while invoking positive and insightful messages that are sure to uplift people from all races and backgrounds."

    Known for his role as Dr. Sheldon Hawkes on the CBS television series "CSI: New York," Harper wrote the best-seller "Letters to a Young Brother: Manifest Your Destiny." Published in 2006, the best-seller provides inspirational lessons and guidance to young African-American men. It earned Harper multiple NAACP Image Awards. Two years later he published "Letters to a Young Sister: Define Your Destiny," an acclaimed best-seller that was geared toward young African-American women.

    Harper's most recent book, "The Conversation: How Men and Women Can Build Loving, Trusting Relationships (2009)," explores the current state of male-female relations in the black community and offers practical solutions on how to improve communication between spouses and across generations. The Iowa City, Iowa native graduated magna cum laude and valedictorian from Brown University and earned both a law degree and graduate degree in public administration from Harvard University.

    Black History Month Events

    Libation Ceremony

    Tues., Feb. 1, 5 p.m.
    DeRosa University Center's River Room, Pacific's Stockton Campus
    Free and open to the public

    The Libation ceremony is the annual kick-off event for Pacific's Black History Month celebration. Students, faculty and staff will gather to honor African American ancestry and history with a long lived tradition that partakes in the pouring of a liquid as a way of honoring those of the past.

    "Urban Poverty and Crime" Open Forum

    Thurs., Feb. 3, 6 p.m.
    DeRosa University Center's Ballroom, Pacific's Stockton Campus
    Free and open to the public

    The public forum will focus on the causes and effects of crime in urban areas. Pacific students, professors, staff and community members will be encouraged to share their thoughts and experiences.

    "Our Family Wedding" Film Showing

    Fri., Feb. 4, 8 p.m.
    Janet Leigh Theatre, Pacific's Stockton Campus
    Tickets are free for students; staff, faculty and alumni are $3; general admission is $5

    "Our Family Wedding (2010)," featuring actors Forest Whitaker and Carlos Mencia, will be shown. The comedy centers around the fathers of a young couple - one from an African-American family and the other from a Latino family - who plan to marry. A discussion will follow the film.

    African-American Financial Aid Workshop

    Sat., Feb. 5, 8:30 a.m.
    DeRosa University Center, Pacific's Stockton Campus
    Free and open to the public

    The African-American Financial Aid workshop will include sessions on financial aid, college and university admissions processes, campus life and college preparation, as well as information for parents.

    Real Talk Discussion: The N-Word

    Wed., Feb. 9, 6 p.m.
    Multicultural Center, Pacific's Stockton Campus
    Free and open to the public

    Pacific students, professors and staff, as well as community members, will gather for a round table discussion about the use of the derogatory term known as the "N-word" and its usage in mass media and society.

    Black Family Heritage Day - It Takes A Village

    Sat., Feb. 12, 9 a.m.
    Grace Covell Hall, Pacific's Stockton Campus
    Free and open to the public

    The all-day event designed to bring the Pacific community and Stockton community together to interact and network, as well as to celebrate the Black family. It will include workshops, a health fair and lunch.

    Real Talk Discussion: Brawn and Body - The Black Male

    Wed., Feb. 16, 6 p.m.
    Multicultural Center, Pacific's Stockton campus
    Free and open to the public

    Pacific students, professors and staff, as well as community members, will gather for a round table discussion about black male stereotypes and how black men are depicted in the media.

    "Good Hair" Documentary Showing

    Thur., Feb. 17, 8 p.m.
    Janet Leigh Theatre, Pacific's Stockton campus
    Tickets are free for students; staff, faculty and alumni are $3; general admission is $5

    The documentary made by comedian Chris Rock explores how black hair is perceived in the black community. The film offers a variety of perspectives from black celebrities and everyday people in the African-American community. A discussion will follow the film.  

    Discussion: Christian, Black and Gay - Removing the Taboo in the Black Community

    Tues., Feb. 22, 7:30 p.m.
    Multicultural Center, Pacific's Stockton campus
    Free and open to the public

    Pacific students, professors and staff, as well as community members, will gather for a round table discussion about homosexuality in the black community and black church.

    Real Talk Discussion: Beauty and Body - The Black Female

    Wed., Feb. 23, 6 p.m.
    Multicultural Center, Pacific's Stockton campus

    Pacific students, professors and staff, as well as community members, will gather for a round table discussion about black female stereotypes and how black women are depicted in the media.

    Poetry Reading by Camille Dungy

    Thurs., Feb. 24, 7 p.m. (reception starts at 6:30 p.m.)
    Wendell Phillips Center, room 140
    Free and open to the public

    Poet Camille Dungy will perform a selection of her works. Dungy is the author of "Suck on the Marrow (Red Hen Press, 2010)" and "What to Eat, What to Drink, What to Leave for Poison (Red Hen Press, 2006)" and was a finalist for the PEN Center USA 2007 Literary Award and the Library of Virginia 2007 Literary Award.

    Apollo Night: Open Mic Competition

    Fri., Feb. 25, 6 p.m.
    Grace Covell Hall
    Free and open to the public

    Student and local acts will perform and compete in a talent show in the tradition of Amateur Night at the historic Apollo Theater in Harlem.

    Keynote Speaker Hill Harper

    Sat., Feb. 26, 8 p.m. (Doors open at 7 p.m., seating is first-come, first-served)
    Faye Spanos Concert Hall
    Free and open to the public

    Actor and author Hill Harper will give a lecture titled "Building a Foundation for Your Life" as the keynote speaker for Pacific's Black History Month celebration.

     

    For more information contact Pacific's Multicultural Center at (209) 946 -7707 or visit go.pacific.edu/blackhistory