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Center for Professional and Continuing Education
800.959.5376 or 209.946.2424
Office Location: 1776 W. March Lane Ste. 290, Stockton, CA 95207
Mailing Address: 3601 Pacific Ave, Stockton, CA 95211
cpce@pacific.edu

Conference Agenda

 

2014 schedule to be announced!! 

2013 Schedule of Workshops & Presentations
Held at Benerd School of Education (map)

 

Friday, June 14

9:00            Continental Breakfast & Sign-in/Same-day Registration:

 Benerd School of Education Lobby

9:30             Welcoming Address: Scott Evans, Dean Lynn Beck

10:00           Concurrent Workshops A & B

A:  David Lloyd Sutton:  Writing the Western  Beginning with a discussion of how willing-suspension-of-disbelief in a favorite genre is a tremendous aid to writers, I'll talk about my own western writing and background, then read bits from classics, demonstrating the genre's breadth. We will examine the common imperatives of all writing. Room 208                 

B:  Scott Evans:  Coming-of-Age Stories:  The loss of innocence is an enduring theme in literature, from J. D. Salinger's novel Catcher in the Rye to films such as Summer of '42 and Risky Business.  This workshop explores methods that writers can use to mine their own experiences for good story arcs and find the right voice for this poignant form of storytelling.  Room 207

11:00          Concurrent Workshops C & D

C:  Cynthia A. Linville: "Is my love life fair game?" Writing Erotic

PoetryYou write something too hot for the average publication. Should you change the details to protect the guilty? Who might give feedback on your erotic poetry? Who might publish it? Should you use a pseudonym? Or should you simply hide your sexy poems from light of day? This workshop explores these and other questions you may have about writing and publishing your steamy poetry. Room 207

D:  Kim Stanley Robinson: "Science Fiction, the Realism of Our

Time"  I will discuss the current state of the science fiction and fantasy markets for fiction, both short fiction and novels. I'll also talk about the techniques that any writer can use to incorporate science, the future, and the fantastic into stories and novels.  Room 208

 

12:00          Lunch (On your own)

1:30            Concurrent Workshops E & F

E:  Scott Evans: Writing a Whodunit Mystery: The dynamics of blending plot and character when composing a good murder mystery can be tricky.  For the reader to stay interested, the writer must dole out clues in small, but recognizable doses, while also ratcheting up the tension and concern for characters.  This workshop offers practical advice on balancing these elements of fiction.  Room 208

F:  Cynthia A Linville: "Is my love life fair game?" Writing Erotic

Poetry.  You write something too hot for the average publication. Should you change the details to protect the guilty? Who might give feedback on your erotic poetry? Who might publish it? Should you use a pseudonym? Or should you simply hide your sexy poems from light of day? This workshop explores these and other questions you may have about writing and publishing your steamy poetry.  Room 207

 

2:30            Concurrent Workshops G & H

G:  Kim Stanley Robinson: "Science Fiction, the Realism of Our  

Time" "I will discuss techniques for writing science fiction that non-scientists can use, and describe the current situation for science fiction and fantasy in the literary marketplace."  Room 207                

H:  Ace Antonio Hall:  YA fiction author and actor Ace Antonio Hall will speak about his love of the horror and science fiction genres and discuss the inspiration and writing process involved with his latest YA novel titled Sylvia Slasher.  Hall earned a BFA from Long Island University with a concentration in acting and screenwriting, and is the [former] vice president of the Greater Los Angeles Writers Society. He joined the group in 2008 and found its lectures and support invaluable aids to his writing, and he will share some of those lessons in this presentation.  Room 208

3:30            Concurrent Workshops I & J

I:  Robin Burcell: "Writing Authentic Crime Stories: Plot &

Character." Character, Plot and Pacing. What are the elements of a good crime novel? Essentially the same as in any good book. Whether you want to give your mystery or thriller that realistic edge, or add some believability to genre fiction, this workshop will give you the basics of what makes a good novel.  Room 207

J:  PANEL DISCUSSION:  Advice on the DO's and DON'T's of writing Query Letters, Book Proposals and Book Synopses.  Robin Burcell, Scott Evans, Adam Russ and others.  Room 208

 

4:30            Open Mic in School of Education Lobby 

5:30            Wine & Cheese Reception-Stockton Hilton, March Lane

6:00            Dinner & Keynote Speaker

Best-selling Author John Lescroart "Twenty Years to Overmight Success!"  Stockton Hilton

 

Saturday, June 15

8:00            Continental Breakfast

9:00             Concurrent Workshops K & L

K:  Karen Levy: Reading from her memoir My Father's Gardens, speaking about what goes into writing, revising, and then pitching to publishers, Karen Levy will explain how persistence led to publication. In this workshop, participants will be informed about some strategies to help you navigate through rejection letters, deal with unsupportive publishers, and cope with less-than-supportive relatives.  Room 208

L:  Robin Burcell: "Theme in Authentic Crime Fiction" Theme in Genre Fiction: Theme is the glue that holds the story together, and yet for many writers, it is one of the most elusive elements to master in fiction. Learn how to use it to make your fiction resonate.  Room 207

 

10:00           Concurrent Workshops M & N

M: Adam David Russ: "Creative Nonfiction: Writing in Today's Hottest Genre." The genre of telling true stories goes by many names-creative nonfiction, narrative nonfiction, literary journalism, feature writing, documentary narrative, and, heaven forbid, the nonfiction novel-but whatever you call it, it's hot! We'll explore the techniques of the craft, the vast array of outlets hungry for true stories well told, and the beauty of truth on the page.  Room 207                 

N: Sam Shane: Writing, Publishing & Marketing Children's Lit.

Sam has written two children's books about the life lessons learned in the game of baseball. He will share how he and a former teammate who illustrated the books developed the characters and content. Sam will discuss the challenges of self-publishing and marketing. He will explore other media and product opportunities in developing a children's book.  Room 208

 

11:00           Concurrent Workshops O & P

O:  Karen Carissimo: Poetry that Matters:  Join Karen Carissimo to learn how one woman distills her life experiences into poetic expressions as lovely and enduring as impressionistic paintings.  You will be inspired by hearing this voice explain the process of harnessing raw, sometimes disturbing emotions into forms that relate, provoke and inspire.  Room 207

P:  Naomi Grossman:  Writing plays that can be performed!

This workshop provides insights into the art of autobiographical storytelling for the stage. Led by theatre award nominated solo writer/performer, Naomi Grossman ("Pepper" from "American Horror Story: Asylum"), whose one-woman shows, "Carnival Knowledge" and "Girl in Argentine Landscape" enjoyed rave reviews and sold-out houses in Edinburgh, London, NY, LA, and universities nationwide. This workshop will help you navigate the pitfalls of the solo show genre, freeing your mind while providing a framework with which to compose fresh, funny, edgy, and poignant, one-person plays.  Room 208

12:00 Lunch (On your own)

1:30            Concurrent Workshops Q & R

Q:  Naomi Grossman: This workshop provides insights into the art of autobiographical storytelling for the stage. Led by theatre award nominated solo writer/performer, Naomi Grossman ("Pepper" from "American Horror Story: Asylum"), whose one-woman shows, "Carnival Knowledge" and "Girl in Argentine Landscape" enjoyed rave reviews and sold-out houses in Edinburgh, London, NY, LA, and universities nationwide. This workshop will help you navigate the pitfalls of the solo show genre, freeing your mind while providing a framework with which to compose fresh, funny, edgy, and poignant, one-person plays.  Room 208               

R:  Karen Carissimo: Poetry that Matters:  Join Karen Carissimo to learn how one woman distills her life experiences into poetic expressions as lovely and enduring as impressionistic paintings.  You will be inspired by hearing this voice explain the process of harnessing raw, sometimes disturbing emotions into forms that relate, provoke and inspire.  Room 207

 

2:30            Concurrent Workshops S & T

S:  Catriona McPherson: After Agatha Christie: The Amateur

Sleuth in Traditional Mysteries:  Almost a century after the start of the British Golden Age (Christie's first Poirot was published in 1920) the traditional mystery is going strong. Police procedurals and legal and forensic thrillers have added realism to the genre, while serial killer thrillers and themed cozies have spun off into the far reaches of possibility, but all the while the descendants of Miss Marple have marched on; solving puzzles, dreaming of justice and insisting that right will prevail. In this session, I'm going to look at the enduring appeal of the traditional mystery and consider what makes good detectives, villains, settings and twists in series fiction and in stand-alone.  Room 208

T: Indigo Moor:  Composing Poetry for Publication  Balance and Movement: Poems That Go When They Should.  How to balance image to statement and make a poem flow. This lecture will discuss movement in poems: how to achieve it and how to artfully maintain it. We will focus on contemporary poets of differing styles and examine tools that poets can use to achieve their own sense of movement.  Room 207

 

3:30            Concurrent Workshops U & V

U:  Indigo Moor:  Composing Poetry for Publication Taming the Hydra: Multi-Genre Writing, Part 1 (Poetry and Fiction)

Teaching poets to write fiction, and authors to write poetry.

This lecture examines the differences, and common pitfalls, of writing in both poetry and fiction. Through discussion, example, and brief (take home) writing exercises, the students will leave with a better understanding of the tools at their disposal to make their poetry look like poetry and their fiction look like fiction.  Room 207

V:  Catriona McPherson: After Agatha Christie: The Amateur Sleuth in Traditional Mysteries Almost a century after the start of the British Golden Age (Christie's first Poirot was published in 1920) the traditional mystery is going strong. Police procedurals and legal and forensic thrillers have added realism to the genre, while serial killer thrillers and themed cozies have spun off into the far reaches of possibility, but all the while the descendants of Miss Marple have marched on; solving puzzles, dreaming of justice and insisting that right will prevail. In this session, I'm going to look at the enduring appeal of the traditional mystery and consider what makes good detectives, villains, settings and twists in series fiction and in stand-alone.  Room 208

 

4:30            Open Mic Readings-School of Education Lobby

 

Sunday, June 16

10:00           Concurrent Workshops W & X

W:  David Lloyd Sutton: Writing a Western: Much of writing in genre is recreating a familiar space for the reader. That space need not be closet-like, it can indeed fill an entire landscape, but it does need some care in its furnishings. The western genre is particularly demanding of expected trappings. Among other things I'll discuss those; they are not just horses and guns.  Room 207

X:  Scott Evans: Writing a Whodunit:  The dynamics of blending plot and character when composing a good murder mystery can be tricky.  For the reader to stay interested, the writer must dole out clues in small, but recognizable doses, while also ratcheting up the tension and concern for characters.  This workshop offers practical advice on balancing these elements of fiction.  Room 208

 

11:00                    Concurrent Sessions Y & Z

Y: Scott Evans:  Traditional Publishing vs. Self-Publishing:  Today writers have more opportunities to publish than ever before in human history, so many options, in fact, that the choice can boggle the mind.  This presentation reviews the pros and cons of traditional publishing versus self-publishing, as well as the many self-publishing venues authors should consider.  We'll also discuss the brave new world of electronic books, in which both problems and possibilities abound.  Room 207

Z Patti McCarthy: Writing the Successful Screenplay:  You have a story to tell and it's a good one. In fact, it's a great one! But how do you turn your great idea into award-winning material? In this workshop, you will learn the "secrets" of a successful screenplay. It's not always who you know, or what you know, but how you can "connect" to your audience that makes all the difference. Room 208

 12:00                  Concurrent Sessions AA & BB

12:00          AA: Mark Travis:  The late and prolific John D. McDonald once said one cannot consider oneself a writer until one has written a million words. I believe, simply, writers write. We cannot help but write. We are happiest when writing. We should write without expectations of readers. We even write in our sleep. Writers write while publishers reject, while prospective agents ignore, and while others enjoy success. I completed twelve novels before my eleventh won a contest and was published. That was nice, but, as a writer, I would be writing without that happening. In this workshop I offer my own experiences to illustrate how dedication to storytelling pays off.  Room 207                

BB:  Patti McCarthy: Writing the Successful Screenplay:  You have a story to tell and it's a good one. In fact, it's a great one! But how do you turn your great idea into award-winning material? In this workshop, you will learn the "secrets" of a successful screenplay. It's not always who you know, or what you know, but how you can "connect" to your audience that makes all the difference. Room 208

1:00                      Session CC

1:00            CC:  Ken Albala:  Join the author or co-author of 16+ books on food and cooking that delight and inform.  This dynamic speaker's descriptions of the history of foods and the development of recipes will make your mouth water and make you hungry for more! Think you know what goes into cookbooks? Breaking into the cookbook market, the cookbook as literature, and the business of publishing-this is the stuff Ken Albala knows.  He's edited many series and has one on food with AltaMira Press now. The Lost Art of Real Cooking and The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home, with Penguin/Perigee.  Room 208

2:00            Closing Discussion & Planning for Next Year's Conference
Room 208

 

 

 Want to learn more??

Creative Writing Class offered Monday, June 17, through Thursday, June 20

6:00-9:00 p.m.  CPCE Classroom, March Lane

 

CREATIVE WRITING COURSE (1 units)
Instructor: R. Scott Evans, M.A. (530)902-0026/sevans@pacific.edu
Fee:  $190.00 for 1 unit/$70.00 for enrichment only.

  

Course Description

This course, offered for extension credit through the University of the Pacific's Center for Professional and Continuing Education, is designed as a workshop for people interested in developing writing skills in any genre: serious prose fiction, adventure, detective, fantasy, murder mystery, science fiction, thriller, western.  We will explore the elements of literature, such as plot, character, setting, symbolism, dialogue, and attempt to apply what we study to our own writing.  Participants will be encouraged to produce manuscripts of any length, from short stories to full-length novels, and bring copies of the pages they are working on to read in the workshop, where we will offer suggestions for revision. 

Participants will not be required to bring writing to every workshop, but they should attempt to bring at least a few pages to five or six meetings.  In order to receive credit, participants will be required to produce a minimum of 20 revised pages.  Submitting manuscripts for publication will be encouraged, and the process explained, but attempting to publish will not be required.  The objectives of this workshop are to gain an understanding of the craft of fiction, to gain discipline in setting and meeting goals for one's writing, and to learn how to edit and revise to produce coherent, polished, and stimulating, meaningful prose.

Required Text 

Orson Scott Card's Elements of Fiction: Characters & Viewpoint.  Cincinnati, Ohio: Writer's Digest Books, 1988.

  

Instructor Biography
Scott Evans, who earned an M.A. in English from U.C. Davis in 1980, has taught writing at the University of the Pacific for twenty years, after having started the Creative Writing courses offered through the Davis Art Center in the early 1980s.  In addition, he has served as the University's Director of Writing Assessment for approximately 15 years.  He also taught at Louisiana State University in the mid-1980s.  He has published numerous newspaper articles, poems, and short prose pieces, but for the past four years, he has also been writing a series of literary murder mysteries.  In 1985, he was the recipient of a Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities Lectureship in Southern Literature.  In 2006, he was nominated for the Eberhardt Teacher/Scholar Award at the University of the Pacific.  Scott's murder mystery Tragic Flaws was published by Xlibris Press in 2008, followed by First Folio: A Literary Mystery, The Complex: A Coming-of-Age Story, Green Seasons, and Sylvia's Secret published by Port Yonder Press in 2013.  Learn more by visiting the website at www.scottevansauthor.com.