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Stauffer Charitable Trust Challenge Grant

In 2014, the Chemistry Department at University of the Pacific was awarded a $500,000 challenge from the John Stauffer Charitable Trust to enhance the research opportunities for undergraduate students majoring in chemistry and biochemistry. The grant will match donations of any amount on a 1:1 basis over the course of a five-year period to create a $1 million John Stauffer Undergraduate Summer Research Endowment in Chemistry and Biochemistry. 

Student chemists pay it forward

When the students of Alpha Chi Sigma, Pacific's professional fraternity for chemists, heard about the Stauffer Charitable Trust Challenge Grant, they swung into action. The result? A $20,000 gift that provides undergraduate research oppotunities for future Pacific chemistry scholars. Read more >>

The Department is determined to provide research opportunities for its students so that their practical skills will improve and they will compete favorably in the job market after graduation.  With chemistry being the second largest major in the College of Pacific, student interest in conducting research far exceeds the availability of resources to fund stipends and equipment. Once the endowment is fully funded, it will provide 10 undergraduate students with research scholarships in perpetuity.

Amelia Watson works with Dr. McCallum"Studying at University of the Pacific has given me an incredible experience. The small class sizes, the faculty who care about their students, and top research facilities all have confirmed my decision to be at Pacific. Undergraduate research has helped me immensely in critically thinking about designing experiments and in interpreting data accurately and clearly in a variety of different fields."
-- Amelia Watson, '14, Stauffer Grant Recipient

Mik Minier with Dr. Liang Xue"I was given my own project in organic chemistry, as well as a project in biochemistry, which allowed me to practice independent learning and a variety of chemical research. Not only did these experiences enhance my resume for admission into MIT's top graduate program in chemistry, but also prepared me for the challenging environment of an MIT chemistry lab."
-- Mik Minier '10, PhD candidate

Jasper Vizzier with fellow students and professors"The positive learning environment helped me gain more confidence as an individual, a student, and a scientist. The opportunities to present at conferences, to publish papers and to be exposed to a plethora of laboratory equipment and techniques contributed to a strong educational and scientific foundation. Overall, my work at University of the Pacific has furthered my career as a researcher by developing my critical thinking, analytical, and problem solving skills."
-- Jasper Visser, '11, Neuroscience Researcher (far left)