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CONTACT US

Communication
209.946.2505
Qingwen Dong
Department Chair
3601 Pacific Avenue
Stockton, CA 95211
qdong@pacific.edu

Communication Courses

Comm. 25 - Introduction to Communication (2)

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course is designed to introduce students to areas of human discourse: interpersonal communication, group and organizational communication, mediated communication, and public speaking. Students will experience both theoretical and practical aspects of this through a combination of lectures, demonstrations, and exercises of the subject.  Students will see an exhibition of various styles, techniques and real-life applications of the subject matter.  Additionally, students will hone their critical thinking skills.  This course will also introduce students to the careers and skills people may pursue with a degree in communication.

RECOMMENDED FOR FRESHMEN: YES
DAYS: Tuesday
HOURS: 10:00 am - 11:45 am
INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Heather Hether
READING LIST: TBA
GRADING: Letter Grade Only
MAXIMUM ENROLLMENT: 25

COMM. 27 - Public Speaking (3)

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
In a complex and culturally diverse world, the ability to communicate effectively has become increasingly important. This course has two interrelated goals. First, it will introduce you to the basic concepts, vocabulary, theories, and processes relevant to understanding public speaking in a wide variety of public and cultural contexts. Second, it will enhance your communication skills by providing systematic opportunities to practice clear, critical, and ethical oral communication. Integrating theory and practice throughout the course, your classroom experience will combine lectures, discussions, small group activities, written assignments, public speeches, and out of class observations as an approach to edify students into become better public speakers and advocates.

RECOMMENDED FOR FRESHMEN: YES
DAYS: Monday
Lecture: (two sections)
Discussion: Wednesday & Fridays; Tuesdays & Thursdays (see course schedule)
HOURS:
Lecture: 2:00 pm - 3:15 pm (Section 01)  Steven K. Farias
Lecture: 3:30 pm - 4:45 pm (Section 02)  Steven K. Farias
Discussions: Various times (see course schedule)
INSTRUCTOR: Pacific Staff 
READING LIST:
Lucas, S (2007), The Art of Public Speaking (9th Edition). Boston: McGraw-Hill
GRADING: Letter Grade Only for Communication majors
Letter Grade or Pass/No Credit for other majors
MAXIMUM ENROLLMENT: 25 students per discussion section

COMM. 31 - Media and Society (3)

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
A survey of the growth and development of mass communications in America (newspaper, radio, television, magazines, public relations) from a historical and descriptive perspective. Principles of the mass communication process. This course is one of the four lower core courses for the communication major.

RECOMMENDED FOR FRESHMEN: YES
DAYS: Mon/Wed/Fri
HOURS: 12:30 pm - 1:45 pm
INSTRUCTOR:   Dr. Paul Turpin
READING LIST:
Media and Culture, 6th Edition, by Campbell, Martin & Fabos, Bedford/St. Martin's,
Additional reading will be handed out in class and assigned.
GRADING: Letter Grade Only
MAXIMUM ENROLLMENT: 40

COMM 43 - Intro. To Interpersonal Communication (3)

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Introduction to the study of human interaction that occurs in relatively informal, everyday social contexts. Using models, theories, and skills of communication as takeoff points, the course introduces students to dimensions related to trust, openness, listening, perception, language, nonverbal communication, conflict, social influence, and communication competence. Focus is to develop an increasing student awareness of the complexities of interpersonal relationships. This course is one of the four lower core courses for the communication major.

RECOMMENDED FOR FRESHMEN: YES
DAYS:  Tues/Thursday
HOURS:  3:00 pm - 4:45 pm
INSTRUCTOR:  Dr. Frances Winters
READING LIST:  Request a syllabus with my email address.
GRADING:  Letter grade or Pass/No Credit
MAXIMUM ENROLLMENT: 40

COMM 50 - Intro. To Communication Technologies (3)

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course provides an introduction to the nature, design, and use of communication technologies, including networks, email, web pages, presentation tools, and groupware. Social impacts and diffusion of new technologies is discussed. Students learn production skills that will be useful in upper division communication courses.  This course is one of the four lower core courses for the communication major.

RECOMMENDED FOR FRESHMEN: Yes - Communication majors only
DAYS: Mon/Wed/Fri                                                              
HOURS:
3:30 pm - 4:45 pm M Lecture
3:30 pm - 4:45 pm W Lab 1
3:30 pm - 4:45 pm F Lab 2                        
INSTRUCTOR:   Dr. Kenneth Day                             
GRADING:  Letter grade only
MAXIMUM ENROLLMENT:  20       

COMM 135 - Principles of Public Relations (4)

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Increase your understanding of Public Relations!  You will study theory and learn how public relations functions in organizations and fills an important role in society.  You will study concepts and theories related to public relations' role and apply them through promotions and presentations.  This course serves as the foundation in Public Relations within the Communication major.  Prerequisites:  Comm. 31

RECOMMENDED FOR FRESHMEN:   (With permission of instructor)
DAYS:  Tuesday/Thursday                                                      
HOURS:  1:00 pm - 2:45 pm
INSTRUCTOR:  Dr. Heather J. Hether                          
READING LIST:
Wilcox, Cameron, Reber, & Shin (2013). THINK: Public Relations.
Boston: Pearson/Allyn & Bacon.  ISBN-13: 978-0-205-85725-8
GRADING:  Letter Grade Only   
MAXIMUM ENROLLMENT:  20                

COMM 139 - Theory of Mass Communication (4)

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course is in transition to Theories of Mediated Communication this semester as we begin to look at theories of how a range of technologies are changing the world and our lives.  These are some of the topics to be discussed:

  • Instant gratification and Internet-based impulse buying of the real and the virtual
  • The use of social networking in political, informational and marketing campaigns
  • The effect of mobile connectivity and social networking on relationships and communication
  • How the internet is changing our cognitive skills for good and bad
  • The growing loss of privacy as we become part of Big Data
  • The retreat from public affairs information in an age of massive and anxiety producing informational overload
  • The impact of online learning on conceptions of learning and the future of higher education
  • The effects of "gamification" - the attempt to make the real world a game
  • Kurzwell's Singularity (computer-based superintelligence that forever changes the world) - what it will mean if it happens
  • Human augmentation and the quality of life

Prerequisite:  Comm. 160 or permission of instructor.
RECOMMENDED FOR FRESHMEN: NO
DAYS: Monday/Wednesday/Friday                                                                            
HOURS:  12:30 pm - 1:45 pm
INSTRUCTOR:  Dr. Ken Day               
READING LIST:  To be provided by the instructor
GRADING:  Letter Grade Only   
MAXIMUM ENROLLMENT:  22   

COMM 140 - Writing for Public Relations (4)

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Writing for Public Relations focuses on core writing skills required of 21st Century Communication/PR professionals. Special emphasis is placed on the "why," as well as the "how." Students will learn to write news releases, feature stories, signed articles, op-ed pieces and letters, information backgrounders, speeches, proposals, etc.  Suggested Prerequisite: Comm. 135

RECOMMENDED FOR FRESHMEN:  NO
DAYS: Wednesday
HOURS: 4:00-7:30 pm    LOCATION: TBD  
INSTRUCTOR: Visiting Prof. David Frederickson
READING LIST:
Wordsmithing: The Art & Craft of Writing for Public Relations - Ron Rhody & Dr. Carol Ann Hackley - The Associated Press Stylebook and Libel Manual
GRADING: Letter grade only
OPTIMUM ENROLLMENT:  15-20

COMM 145 - Human Communication Theory (4)

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
A study of contemporary understandings of human interaction. Beginning with epistemological issues as a framework, the course examines theory building, foundation theories of our discipline, and contextual theories.

RECOMMENDED FOR FRESHMEN: NO
DAYS:  Tuesday/Thursday                                        
HOURS: 10:00 am - 11:45 am                                   
INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Frances Winters               
READING LIST:  Request a syllabus with my email address.
Miller, Katherine (2004). Communication Theories: Perspectives, Processes, and Contexts. New York: McGraw Hill.  Sagan, C.  (1997)  Demon Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark.  New York: Ballantine Books.
GRADING:   Letter Grade or Pass/No Credit 
MAXIMUM ENROLLMENT:  25 

COMM 149 - Introduction to Organizational Communication (4)

COURSE DESCRIPTION: 
This course takes both a theoretical and an applied approach in introducing the student to the role of communication in various aspects of organizational functioning, such as motivation, leadership, decision-making, conflict management, etc.

A significant portion of the course content is presented in lectures and journal article readings with focus on organizational theories and processes in combination with communication theory. The primary learning modality is through human process and interaction. At least one class each week is composed of group activities designed to enhance learning.  Embedded in this course is a group project which creates opportunities to work as a team, to network, and to apply class learning to real world problems.    Prerequisites:  Comm. 27, 43 or permission of the instructor.

RECOMMENDED FOR FRESHMAN:  With Professor approval only.
DAYS:  Tues/Thurs                                                      
HOURS:  3:00 pm - 4:45 pm
INSTRUCTOR:  Christine Collaco
READING LIST:  TBD
GRADING:  Letter Grade Only
MAXIMUM ENROLLMENT:  20

COMM 150 - Communication Capstone (4)

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course is a senior level capstone seminar devoted to applying what students have learned in the communication major to contemporary communication issues.   Students undertake research and employ a variety of communication methodologies and theories to uncover the social, historical, and ethical implications of their communication interest. 

RECOMMENDED FOR FRESHMEN: NO
DAYS:  Tue/Thu                                              
HOURS:  1:00 - 2:45
INSTRUCTOR:  Dr. Teresa Bergman             
READING LIST:
Gladwell, M. (2008). Outliers: The Story of Success. New York: Little, Brown and
Company.  Sillars, Malcom O. and Bruce E. Gronbeck (2001) Communication Criticism:
Rhetorical Social Codes, Cultural Studies. Prospect Heights, Illinois: Waveland Press.   Anderson, W.T. (2004). All Connected Now: Life in the First Global Civilization. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.
GRADING  Letter Grade Only
MAXIMUM ENROLLMENT: 20

COMM 151 - Community Based Learning (2)

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This senior-level capstone course provides students with a supervised learning experience in an off-campus, community-based organization. Students will apply their knowledge of communication theories and skills to the needs of local organizations, allowing them to contribute to the public good. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

DAYS: Mon & Wed    
HOURS:  2:00 - 3:15
INSTRUCTOR:  Christine Collaco                  
READING LIST:  Readings for the course will be provided by the instructor.
GRADING:  Letter Grade Only
MAXIMUM ENROLLMENT:  15       

COMM 160 - Communication Research Methods (4)

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
A study of research methods appropriate for examining communication related problems. Topics for the course include descriptive methods, and experimental methods, statistical models for data analysis and research reporting and writing. Prerequisites: COMM 027, 031, and 043 with a C+ or better.

RECOMMENDED FOR FRESHMEN:  NO
DAYS:  Mon/Wed/Fri                 
HOURS:  9:30 - 10:45                            
INSTRUCTOR:  Dr. Qingwen Dong                   
READING Requirement:
Schutt, R. K. (2015) Investigating the Social World (8th Edition): The process and practice of research. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.  Salkind, N. (2014) Statistics for People Who Hate Statistics (5th edition). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
GRADING:  Letter Grade Only
MAXIMUM ENROLLMENT:  20

Graduate Courses

COMM 261. Critical and Qualitative Research Methods (4)
COMM 262. Quantitative Research Methods
COMM 271. Graduate Seminar in Rhetorical Thought (4)
COMM 272. Graduate Seminar in Interpersonal Communication (4)
COMM 273. Graduate Seminar in mass Communication Theory (4)
COMM 275. Graduate Seminar in Public Relations (4)
COMM 276. Communication in Learning Settings (4)
COMM 277. Media Relations (4)
COMM 278. Political Communication (4)
COMM 287. Graduate Internship (2 or 4)
COMM 289. Graduate Practicum (2 or 4)
COMM 291. Independent Graduate Study (2-4)
COMM 293. Special Topics (2-4)
COMM 297. Graduate Research (1-4)
COMM 299. Thesis