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Semester Offerings

Fall 2013 Course Offerings
Comm. 25 Intro. to Communication (Marlin Bates)
Comm. 27 Public Speaking/Sec. 01 (Jon Schamber) 8 discussion groups
Comm. 27 Public Speaking/Sec. 02 (Mariela Guzman/Adjunct)
Comm. 31 Media & Society (Alan Ray)
Comm. 43 Intro. to Interpersonal Communication (Randy Koper) 5 discussion groups
Comm. 50 Intro. to Communication Technology (Ken Day) 4 labs
Comm. 117 Political Advocacy (Paul Turpin)
Comm. 131 Media Production (Alan Ray)
Comm. 135 Principles of Public Relations (Heather J. Hether)
Comm. 139 Theory of Mass Communication (Ken Day)
Comm. 140 Writing for Public Relations (Dave Frederickson)
Comm. 143 Intercultural Communication (Ken Day)
Comm. 145 Human Communication Theory (Randy Koper)
Comm. 149 Intro. to Organization Communication (Christine Collaco/Adjunct)
Comm. 150 The Capstone (Teresa Bergman)
Comm. 151 Community Based Learning (Christine Collaco - Adjunct)
Comm. 160 Communication Research Methods (Qingwen Dong)

Graduate Seminars:
Comm. 261 Critical & Qualitative Research Methods (Teresa Bergman)
Comm. 271 Rhetorical Thought (Marlin Bates)
Comm. 275 Public Relations (Heather J. Hether)


COMM 25 - Introduction to Communication
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Introduction to Communication is designed to introduce you to areas of human discourse:
interpersonal communication, group and organizational communication, mediated communication and public speaking. You will experience both theoretical and practical aspects of this through a combination of lectures, demonstrations and exercises of the subject. You will see an exhibition of various styles, techniques and real-life applications of the subject matter.  Additionally, you will hone your critical thinking skills. This course will also introduce you to the careers and skills you may pursue with a degree in communication.

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES:
• Use appropriate skills necessary to research, organize and deliver written and oral presentations effectively.
• Plan and undertake group-based work toward a common goal.
• Describe and critique scholarly literature.
• Describe and explain the impacts of mediated communication on individuals and society.
• Use appropriate media and communication technologies.
• Understand and apply ethical principles in communication.
• Discover and classify careers and pathways in communication, including public relations, journalism, education and others.

RECOMMENDED FOR FRESHMEN: YES
DAYS: Tuesday
HOURS: 1:00 pm - 2:45 pm
INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Marlin Bates
READING LIST: TBA
GRADING: Letter Grade Only
MAXIMUM ENROLLMENT: 25


COMM 27 - Public Speaking
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course is designed to help students develop and improve their public speaking skills. The primary learning objectives of the course include (1) developing confidence in presenting speeches, (2) adapting messages for a particular audience, (3) creating rhetorical appeals and selecting appropriate supporting materials for speeches, (4) demonstrating skills in researching, organizing, and outlining speeches, and (4) using effective vocal and non-vocal delivery techniques.

RECOMMENDED FOR FRESHMEN: YES
DAYS:
Lecture: Mondays (two sections)
Discussion: Wednesday & Fridays; Tuesdays& Thursdays (see course schedule)

HOURS:
Lecture: 3:30 pm - 4:50 pm (Section 01)
Lecture: 5:30 pm - 6:50 pm (Section 02)
Discussions: Various times (see course schedule)

INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Jon Schamber (Section 01)
Prof. Mariela Guzman - Adjunct (Section 02)

READING LIST:
Lucas, S (2007), The Art of Public Speaking (9thEdition). Boston: McGraw-Hill

GRADING:
Letter Grade Only for Communication majors
Letter Grade or Pass/No Credit for other majors

MAXIMUM ENROLLMENT: 25 students per discussion section


COMM 31 - Media and Society
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course surveys the growth and development of mass communication in the U.S. (i.e. newspaper, radio, television, film, magazines, public relations, Internet) from historical and descriptive perspectives, which include the principles of mass communication and media-effects theories. The course covers historic and contemporary aesthetic developments in all aspects of mass media, and students develop critical skills in order to evaluate sources of mediated information. This course is one of the four lower division core courses for the communication major and satisfies the I-B U.S. Studies General Education requirement.

Learning Objectives:
At the end of the semester, a student will be able to:
• Understand the history of major events of mass communication
• Grasp the current framework of the media industries
• Comprehend the influences of media upon society
• Gain insight into media production
• Understand the need for informed and evaluative analysis of media content

RECOMMENDED FOR FRESHMEN: YES
DAYS: Mon/Wed/Fri
HOURS: 8:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.
INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Alan Ray
READING LIST:  Media and Culture, 6th Edition, by Campbell, Martin & Fabos, Bedford/St. Martin's,
Additional reading will be handed out in class and assigned.
GRADING: Letter Grade Only
MAXIMUM ENROLLMENT: 40


COMM 43 - Intro. to Interpersonal Communication
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
The main body of the course consists of one two-hour lecture and one one-hour small-group discussion session per week. The lectures provide a forum for presentation of the primary course content; the small-group section presents an interpersonal laboratory in which the themes from the textbook and lectures can be explored. Because of the interdependence of these two components of the course, student presence and participation in class discussion and exercises is required. Twenty percent of the student's course grade will be based on his/her participation in the discussion section. Two short, written take-home assignments will allow the student to focus on the "real world" application of the principles discussed in class.

RECOMMENDED FOR FRESHMEN: YES
DAYS:
Lecture: Tuesday
Discussions: Wed./ Thurs.
HOURS: 3:00 pm - 4:50 pm
Discussions: (Check times online)
INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Randall Koper
READING LIST:
Trenholm, S. and Jensen, A. (2003). Interpersonal Communication, (5th ed). New York: Oxford University Press.
GRADING: Letter Grade or Pass/No Credit
MAXIMUM ENROLLMENT: 100


COMM 50 - Intro. to Communication Technology
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course provides an introduction to the nature, design and strategic use of communication technologies, including web sites, social networking, blogging, podcasting, posting from a mobile device and sites such as Flickr and YouTube as well as basic skills in working with digital images, audio and video. Students learn to apply communication technology to promote themselves and organizations for whom they may work in their careers. Lab fee required as well as the purchase of educationally discounted web hosting from bluehost.com.

RECOMMENDED FOR FRESHMEN: Yes - Communication majors only
DAYS: Mon. (Lecture)
HOURS: 9:30 am - 10:45 am
LABS: (Check times online)
INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Kenneth Day
READING LIST: A free eBook, Using Communication Technologies, written by Prof. Day, will be provided to be used with the http://www.usingcommtechnologies.com website.
GRADING: Letter grade only
MAXIMUM ENROLLMENT: 17


COMM 117 - Political Advocacy
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course examines how to identify political audiences and craft appeals to them, whether in a social movement or advocacy group, or in electoral politics and government. The class will operate on the model of a consulting firm, where students will develop their own individual advocacy projects while continuing to discuss everyone's projects as they develop. The written and oral assignments are designed to create an advocacy plan, as one would do for a client, and to write a justification for its strategies using course concepts, as one would do for a supervisor.

The subject matter of the course, taking up the first half of the semester, focuses on how political identity is constructed and deployed in advocacy on matters of public action. Topics include how persuasive appeals frame political arguments, why portrayal of character plays a pivotal role in social and political campaigns, how voters reason, the historical roots of contemporary political ideologies as systems of beliefs, and the functions and dysfunctions of the media in public debate and political campaigns. This course counts toward the Theory requirement of the Communication major and has significant research and writing requirements.

RECOMMENDED FOR FRESHMEN: YES
DAYS: Mon/Wed/Fri
HOURS: 12:30 pm - 1:45 pm
INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Paul Turpin
READING LIST: Readings will be online resources plus a course pack of selected book chapters and articles.
GRADING: Letter Grade Only
MAXIMUM ENROLLMENT: 20


COMM 131 - Media Production
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course focuses upon the development of audio and video productions in both amateur and professional settings. Students will learn the 3 phases of media production, along with aesthetic and critical principles of these unique art forms. Also, basic fundamentals of lighting, sound, camera work, and editing will be stressed. Lab fee is required.

RECOMMENDED FOR FRESHMEN: No
DAYS: Mon/Wed/Fri
HOURS: 9:30 am - 10:45 am
INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Alan Ray
READING LIST: NA
GRADING: Letter
MAXIMUM ENROLLMENT: 25


COMM 135 - Principles of Public Relations
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Increase your understanding of Public Relations! You will study theory and learn how public relations functions in organizations and fills an important role in society. You will study concepts and theories related to public relations' role and apply them through promotions and presentations. This course serves as the foundation in Public Relations within the Communication major. Prerequisites: Comm. 31

RECOMMENDED FOR FRESHMEN: (With permission of instructor)
DAYS: Tues./Thurs.
HOURS: 1:00 pm - 2:45 pm
INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Heather J. Hether
READING LIST: Effective Public Relations- Cutlip, Center & Broom
GRADING: Letter Grade Only
MAXIMUM ENROLLMENT: 25


COMM 139/239 - Theory of Mass Communication
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
An overview of major theories and research in mass communication.  Application of theories that explain and predict communication effects of political campaigns, advertising, entertainment, and information. Theoretical areas to be covered include socialization, information, diffusion, advertising, persuasion, and uses and gratification's research. The state, function, and form of theory of mass communication will be discussed.  Prerequisite: Comm. 160 or permission of instructor.

RECOMMENDED FOR FRESHMEN: NO
DAYS: Mon/Wed/Fri
HOURS: 12:30 pm - 1:45 pm
INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Ken Day
READING LIST: Readings to be provided by the instructor.
GRADING: Letter Grade Only
MAXIMUM ENROLLMENT: 25


COMM 140 - Writing for Public Relations
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Writing for Public Relations is the course that focuses on the core writing skills required of a 21stCentury media communications professional, whatever specialized area of the profession that individual may choose to pursue. Special emphasis will be placed on those writing applications of particular value to those aspiring to a career in the arena of public relations. More specifically, featured topics that we will explore together will include: news releases for PR, feature stories, signed articles, op-ed pieces and letters, information backgrounders, speeches, program writing and scripting, to name a few. Successful completion of this course should provide you with the skills and knowledge to embrace the art of writing as a central tool in your range of activities as a future public relations professional. At the end of our time together, you should be able to:
• Easily identify the many different writing forms we have explored;
• Produce any of these forms necessary to carry out the assignments given to you as aworking communications professional; and,
• Recognize these written pieces and their impact on the products, services, issues, clients, organizations and communities they address.
Prerequisite: Comm. 135.
RECOMMENDED FOR FRESHMEN: NO
DAYS: Tues/Thurs
HOURS: 10:00 am - 11:45 am
INSTRUCTOR: Visiting Professor David W. Frederickson, Director of Pacific's GrassRoots Global Institute, in the Jacoby Center, brings a broad spectrum of experience to this course.  Frederickson returns to Pacific from Washington, DC, where he has served the past 25 years in a variety of senior public affairs positions, most recently as Counselor for Communications at the U.S. Small Business Administration. As a media communications professional, Frederickson has been through nine Presidential campaigns; worked for five Presidents; traveled well over a million miles. He has worked with thousands of media professionals, around the world, including the White House Press Corps. As an award winning member of the news media, he has more than 15 years of broadcast experience. During those years he served as anchor, host, correspondent, producer, and executive producer of some 700 television programs, documentaries and special projects. In those years, he interviewed close to 2000 newsmakers at the local, regional and national level.
READING LIST: WORDSMITHING: The Art & Craft of Writing for Public Relations by Ron Rhody and Dr. Carol Ann Hackley; The Associated Press Stylebook and Libel Manuel; On Deadline: Managing Media Relations, Carole M. Howard & Wilma K. Mathews.
GRADING: Letter grade only
MAXIMUM ENROLLMENT: 20


COMM 143 - Intercultural Communication
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course provides an analysis of the major cultural variables and differing worldviews affecting interpersonal communication between persons of differing cultural backgrounds.  Exposure is given to a range of cultures with particular emphasis on Japan and the Middle East as cultures greatly different from that of the United States but each in two very different sets of ways. A major theme of the course is that culture shapes what we value and how we see the world. Racism and prejudice are addressed as well as suggested techniques for managing intercultural conflict. The course uses a combination of lecture and discussion along with relevant movies and exercises in intercultural contact as well as experiential learning in the community.

RECOMMENDED FOR FRESHMAN: NO
DAYS: Mon./Wed./Fri.
HOURS: 3:30 pm - 4:45 pm
INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Kenneth Day
READING LIST: (Required Texts)
Samovar/Porter/McDaniel, Communication Between Cultures (7thEdition) (Main Text)
Davies & Ikeno, The Japanese Mind: Understanding Contemporary Japanese Culture(4th Edition)
Nydell, Understanding Arabs: A Guide for Modern Times
GRADING: Letter grade only
MAXIMUM ENROLLMENT: 25


COMM 145/245 - Human Communication Theory
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course is designed to develop the student's understanding of past and present theoretical issues in the study of human communication. The course begins with a survey of various epistemological schemes, reviewing both traditional and scientific approaches to reasoning and knowledge. The course will continue by developing the student's vocabulary of important concepts in discussing theory and theory building. After a review of several general theoretical perspectives, current thematic and contextual theories of human communication will be examined.

RECOMMENDED FOR FRESHMEN: NO
DAYS: Tues./Thurs.
HOURS: 10:00 am - 11:45 am
INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Randall Koper
READING LIST:
Miller, Katherine.(2004). Communication Theories: Perspectives, Processes, and Contexts. New York: McGraw Hill. Sagan, C. (1997). Demon Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark.  New York: Ballantine Books.
GRADING: Letter Grade or Pass/No Credit
MAXIMUM ENROLLMENT: 25


COMM 149/249 - Intro. to Organization Communication
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course takes both a theoretical and an applied approach in introducing the student to the role of communication in various aspects of organizational functioning, such as motivation, leadership, decision-making, conflict management, message management, etc. A significant portion of the course content is found in the textbook and focuses on organizational theories and processes in combination with communication theory. Additional material is presented in lectures and readings. Each student is responsible for the entire content of the textbook, lectures, and related readings. The primary learning modality is through human process and interaction.  At least one class each week is composed of group activities designed to enhance learning.  Embedded in the course is a team project, a portion of which, takes place in an organization. This experiential learning creates opportunities to work in a team, to gain professional experience, to network, and to apply class learning to real world problems. Prerequisites: Comm. 27, 43 or permission of the instructor.

RECOMMENDED FOR FRESHMAN: With Professor approval only.
DAYS: Tues/Thurs
HOURS: 3:00 pm - 4:45 pm
INSTRUCTOR: Prof. Christine Collaco - Adjunct
READING LIST: TBA
GRADING: Letter Grade Only
MAXIMUM ENROLLMENT: 20


COMM 150 - Communication Capstone
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course is a senior-level seminar devoted to situating what students have learned in the Communication Major within a broader social and ethical context, and preparing students to move forward with confidence into a world where valuing and learning never stop. Topics include the role of communication in sustaining community, standards for ethical communication, communication's role in moral decision making, and other topics of interest to the students and the instructor. Prerequisites: Senior standing, completed Communication core classes.

RECOMMENDED FOR FRESHMEN: NO
DAYS: Tues/Thurs
HOURS: 1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Teresa Bergman
Required Texts:
Gladwell, M. (2008). Outliers: The Story of Success. New York: Little, Brown and Company.
Ott, Brian and Robert Mack, (2010). Critical Media Studies: An Introduction. Wiley-Blackwell.
Rubin, Rebecca and Alan, (2009). Communication Research: Strategies and Sources.
Wadsworth Publishing.
Anderson, W.T. (2004). All Connected Now: Life in the First Global Civilization. Boulder, CO:
Westview Press.
Recommended Readings:
Littlejohn, Stephen W. and Karen A. Foss, (2010). Theories of Human Communication.10th edition. Long Grove, IL: Waveland Press.
Bryant, Jennings and Mary Beth Oliver (2008). Media Effects: Advances in Theory and Research. New York and London: Routledge Communication Series).
Campbell, Richard and Christopher Martin and Bettina Fabos, (2011). Media and Culture: An Introduction to Mass Communication. Boston/New York: Bedford/St. Martin's.
GRADING Letter Grade Only
MAXIMUM ENROLLMENT: 20


COMM 151 - Community Based Learning (2 units)
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Community Based Learning is a capstone course for seniors in Communication. It is an experiential learning course that provides Communication majors with an opportunity to apply their communication skills and knowledge of the discipline to worthwhile projects for non-profit organizations. Also, the course is designed to support the mission of the Department of Communication: preparing students in the strategic use of communication for the public good as leaders in their local and global communities. The learning outcomes of the course are as follows: (1) advocating the mission and programs of a community organization, (2) designing a plan for a community project, (3) executing the plan for a community project, (4) evaluating the plan and execution of a community project, (5) exhibiting mastery of teamwork and collaboration skills, and (6) demonstrating mastery of written and oral communication skills.  Pre-requisite: Senior standing.

DAYS: Mon & Wed
HOURS: 2:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
INSTRUCTOR: Prof. Christine Collaco - Adjunct
READING LIST: Readings for the course will be provided by the instructor.
GRADING: Letter Grade Only
MAXIMUM ENROLLMENT: 20


COMM 160/260 - Communication Research Methods
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course is designed to introduce students to basic social and behavioral research methods applicable to the study of communication problems and processes. The course is designed to help student understand communication research methods, critique and analyze communication research studies, conduct basic research to answer communication questions and solve communication problems. Students are expected to develop a better understanding of the "logic" of the research process, and develop skills in designing research instruments, applying both quantitative and qualitative research methods to solve problems, using statistical package to conduct data analysis, and writing empirical reports. Students are also expected to understand the role of ethics in doing communication research. Prerequisite: Comm. 27, 31 and 43 with a C+, or better.

RECOMMENDED FOR FRESHMEN: NO
DAYS: Mon/Wed/Fri
HOURS: 11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.
INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Qingwen Dong
READING LIST:
Schutt, R. K. (2006) Investigating the Social World(5th Edition): The process and practice of research. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Dong, Q. (2008)
Readings in Communication Research Methods. San Diego, CA, University Readers
GRADING: Letter Grade Only
MAXIMUM ENROLLMENT: 20


COMM 261 - Graduate Seminar: Critical and Qualitative Research Methods
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
The course provides a graduate-level introduction to qualitative methods used in communication studies. Topics covered provide an overview of rhetorical analysis, critical and cultural studies, ethnography, and case studies in public relations. The course emphasizes the connection between the theoretical foundations of qualitative inquiry and their applications to communicative interactions. Applications include the writing of criticism, fieldwork in ethnography, and case studies. Graduate Students Only

DAYS: Tuesday
HOURS: 5:00 pm - 8:30 pm
INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Teresa Bergman
READING LIST: Will be distributed at the first class meeting.
GRADING: Letter Grade Only
MAXIMUM ENROLLMENT: 15


COMM 271 - Grad. Seminar: Rhetorical Thought
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Rhetorical Theory and Practice takes the skills you have acquired in other communication courses and directs them to "peek behind the curtain." By understanding and employing rhetorical theory you will better understand how arguments are constructed to distribute messages and attempt to gain adherence to those messages. You will be able to join, as Kenneth Burke stated, "the never-ending conversation." Once you join the conversation, your world will never look the same again. Graduate Students Only

DAYS: Monday
HOURS: 5:00 pm - 8:30 pm
INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Marlin Bates
READING LIST: TBA
GRADING: Letter Grade Only
MAXIMUM ENROLLMENT: 15


COMM 275 - Graduate Seminar: Public Relations
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This graduate seminar will review the theories, advanced concepts, and principles of public relations and their application to current practice. Through readings and discussion of scholarly public relations research, students will develop their understanding of how public relations theory is developed, tested, and applied to public relations practice. Graduate Students Only

DAYS: Thursday
HOURS: 4:00 pm - 7:30 pm
INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Heather J. Hether
READING LIST: Course readings are drawn primarily from journal articles published in Communication Education.
GRADING: Letter Grade Only
MAXIMUM ENROLLMENT: 15