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Amy Smith

Amy SmithBefore I came to Pacific I taught at a state university where I’d have as many as 90 students per class.

That’s not how I want to do my job.

When I teach Technical Communications here I meet with each student to go over their resumes and the proposals they write for projects, since all of my students create documents for real clients—not just papers that get a grade and go into a drawer.

Over the years students have produced promo materials for the Humboldt Crabs baseball team, Standard Specifications for the Stockton Municipal Utilities Department, and guidelines for tutors at Pacific’s Center for Community Involvement.

This is practical experience that goes straight on their resumes or into an electronic portfolio to show that they’ve got what employers are looking for—strong communication skills.

I also help students take classic literature beyond the classroom.

My Jane Austen class puts on a public Austen event in December where we eat, drink, and celebrate work ranging from lessons they’ve taught in local schools, to stories and poems they’ve written, to multi-media projects.

A hit in December 2007 was the Subversive Austen photo shoot (Jane and Elizabeth Bennett like you’ve never seen them before!).

Pacific’s small classes make it possible to do active projects, which demand a lot from students but promote vital interpersonal and practical skills.