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Derek Isetti, PhD, CCC-SLP

Assistant Professor

Contact

Phone: 209.932.3553
Email: disetti1@pacific.edu

Education

BA in Drama, University of California, Irvine, 1996

MS in Speech-Language Pathology, University of the Pacific, 2008

PhD in Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, 2014

At Pacific Since: 2014

Derek Isetti '08, PhD, CCC-SLP earned his bachelor of arts in drama with an emphasis in musical theater from University of California, Irvine in 1996. After traveling the country in four national tours and performing in the musical Cabaret on Broadway, Dr. Isetti returned to school and in 2008 he earned his master of science in speech-language pathology from University of the Pacific. He later earned his doctor of philosophy in speech and hearing sciences from University of Washington, studying voice disorders under the mentorship of Dr. Tanya Eadie. In 2013 Dr. Isetti was awarded the New Century Doctoral Scholar Award from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation. He joined the Pacific faculty in 2014.

Dr. Isetti is a member of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) and the California Speech-Language-Hearing Association. From 2014 to 2016 he served as one of six members on the national Coordinating Committee for ASHA's Special Interest Group for Voice Disorders, serving as the Professional Development Manager.

Dr. Isetti is happy to be back in his hometown of Stockton and to be working alongside the same professors who inspired him when he was a graduate student at Pacific.

 

Teaching Philosophy: “To inspire students the way I was inspired and challenged while I was a graduate student here at Pacific.”

Courses:

SLPA 125 - Speech Sound Disorders I
SLPA 131 - Phonetics
SLPA 219 - Speech Sound Disorders II
SLPA 217 - Voice Disorders

 

Research Summary: “My research focuses on listener impressions and the employment barriers faced by individuals with chronic voice disorders.”

Research Interests:
Occupational Impact of Voice Disorders
Listener Impressions and Bias
Spasmodic Dysphonia