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Courses

(This list of courses may not be up to date. Please see the latest General Catalog for a complete list of current courses.)

PSYC 029. Child Development (4) An introduction to and an overview of human structural and behavioral change from conception through adolescence. The emphasis is on normal processes and patterns of development, research-based information about these patterns and processes, associated theories of human development which emphasize infant and child behavior and the continuities between child and adult behaviors. Practical application of principles is stressed. Limited field observations of young children are required. Recommended for sophomores. Does not count toward major.

PSYC 031. Introduction to Psychology (4) An introduction to the following areas of psychology: 1) history and systems of psychology; 2) experimental methods in psychology; 3) psychology of learning; 4) verbal learning and memory; 5) child and developmental psychology; 6) motivation; 7) personality; 8) abnormal psychology; 9) perception and sensory psychology; 10) physiological psychology; and 11) behavioral medicine. Required for psychology majors; recommended in freshman year.

PSYC 053. Behavior Change I (4) An introduction to behavior analysis and therapy. Stresses the application of behavior change principles to oneself and to a variety of problems and populations. Students will be taught to observe and measure behavior and to implement and evaluate behavior change interventions. Three hours per week in training settings are required in addition to class meetings. Supervision of undergraduate students will be provided by the instructor and graduate students. Required for psychology majors; recommended for freshmen.

PSYC 066. Human Sexuality (4) Study of the biological, psychological and cultural bases of human sexual behavior. Topics will include female and male sexual anatomy and physiology; love and communication; sexual behavior patterns; homosexuality and bisexuality; contraception, pregnancy and childbirth; sexual difficulties and sex therapy; and sexually transmitted diseases. Reviews changes in sexual functioning throughout the life span. Explores the development of male and female gender roles and the effect of gender roles on various aspects of life. Open to freshmen. Does not count toward major.

PSYC 087, 187. Internship (2 or 4, 2 or 4) Experiences in a work setting, to be contracted on an individual basis. PSYC 187 represents advanced internship work involving increased independence and responsibility. Students may register for only one course listed below in any semester and may receive no more than four units of credit for any of these courses. Pass/No Credit grading only. PSYC 087a, 187a. Business and Industrial Internship Supervised experience in performance management and training in business and industrial settings. PSYC0 87b, 187b. Developmental Disabilities Internship Supervised experience in agencies providing services to the developmentally disabled. PSYC 087c, 187c. Educational/Training Internship Supervised experience in educational and training institutions and agencies. PSYC 087d, 187d. Human Development and Family Intervention Internship Supervised experience in family, social welfare, educational or correctional settings concerned with the development of physically disabled young people, socially deviant young people and/or physically and socially normal young people. PSYC 087e, 187e. Mental Disabilities Internship Supervised experience in agencies providing services to the mentally disabled. PSYC 087f, 187f. Autism Internship Supervised experience working with autistic children. Prerequisite: PSYC 053.

PSYC 089, 189. Practicum (2 or 4, 2 or 4) Non-classroom experiences in activities related to the curriculum under conditions determined by the appropriate faculty member. PSYC 189 represents advanced practicum work involving increased independence and responsibility. Students may register for only one course listed below in any semester and may receive no more than four units of credit for any of these courses. Pass/No credit grading only. PSYC 089d, 189d. Research Assistantship Practicum Students will acquire skills in the design and implementation of psychological research while serving as assistants to faculty conducting research projects. PSYC 089e, 189e. Teaching of Psychology Practicum Students will acquire skills in the development and use of Personalized Systems of Instruction, discussion groups or laboratories while serving as assistants to faculty teaching departmental courses.

PSYC 103. Statistical Inference in Behavioral Sciences (4) The applications and limitations of statistical methods of inference in behavioral research. Topics include measurement, data collection, parameter estimation and confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, Type I and Type II errors and power. Parametric and non-parametric data analysis techniques and graphic analysis will be studied, including chi square, t-test and analysis of variance. Students will learn how to use “eyeball” estimation procedures to facilitate understanding of statistical concepts, and how to use spread sheet and statistical computer programs for data analysis. Prerequisite: MATH 003 or appropriate score on the Mathematics Placement Test. PSYC 103 (or MATH 035) required for psychology majors; recommended in sophomore year.

PSYC 105. Experimental Psychology (5) Introduction to research methodology in the field of psychology. The course covers experimental design and statistical analysis appropriate to various designs. Conducting reviews of research literature, writing research proposals and reports, and research ethics will be covered. All students will do word processing and statistical analysis using computer programs. All students complete an individual experimental research project. Prerequisite: PSYC 103 or MATH 035. Required for psychology majors; recommended in sophomore year; not open to freshmen.

PSYC 107. Psychology of Learning (4) Explanation and prediction of behavior change in humans and animals in terms of simple learning processes. Emphasis on theoretical interpretation of learning phenomena. Prerequisite: PSYC 105 or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 109. Physiological Psychology (4) Study of the relationship between behavior and the structure and functioning of the nervous system. Both theoretical research and clinical applications helpful in understanding human behavior are emphasized in lecture and in laboratory exercises. Prerequisite: PSYC 105 or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 110. Psychoactive Drugs and Behavior (4) An intensive study of how drugs affect psychological processes and behavior, covering neuroanatomy, neuron physiology, basic psychopharmacological terminology, commonly used and recreational drugs, major psychotherapeutic drugs and the interaction between drug treatments and various psychotherapeutic and behavior change techniques. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or above.

PSYC 111. Abnormal Psychology (4) Study of the causes, classification and treatment of abnormal behavior. The class will be of interest to any student who is curious about people and what they do, especially the unusual things that people do. The class addresses the distinction between being different and having a mental disorder, what we can change and what we can not change, psychological testing, the DSM classification system, the role of genetic factors in abnormal behavior as well as the current status of empirically validated psychosocial and pharmacological treatments for mental disorders. The class is highly recommended for any student who aspires to go into clinical psychology, marriage family counseling, child psychology, forensic psychology, social work, or clinical psychopharmacology.

PSYC 115. Cognitive Psychology (4) Introduction to the field of cognitive psychology, focusing on the mental processes that underlie thinking, remembering/forgetting, perception, attention, knowledge, language, and problem solving. Current research on cognition, as well as applications of research findings, will be emphasized in lecture and in laboratory activities. Prerequisite: PSYC 105 or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 125. History and Systems of Psychology (4) A survey of the history of the various systems and schools of psychology with emphasis upon the interaction of experimentation, observation (empirical contributions) and speculation (theory building) in the development of modern psychology. Required for psychology majors. Prerequisite: junior standing and PSYC 105 or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 129. Developmental Psychology (4) Comparison of major models and specific theories of the development of behavior. Overview of research methodology including those methods particularly appropriate to the study of developmental phenomena. Major emphasis on current empirical theory and data about child development. Completion of a child research study. Prerequisite: PSYC 105 or permission of the instructor..

PSYC 131. Adolescence and Young Adulthood (4) A psychosocial examination of the transition from childhood to adulthood. Topics include: conceptual issues and moral development, sexual and personality changes, role conflicts and problems unique to adolescence. Material has been selected to be of interest both to majors who plan to work with adolescents and to students who want to better understand their own life cycle phase or their future role as parents of adolescents. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or above.

PSYC 133. Adulthood and Aging (4) This course provides an overview of developmental issues occurring in the adult and aging population. Topics covered include developmental theories, research techniques, and biological, psychological, and sociological aspects of aging. Some emphasis will be placed on providing psychological services to the aging population. Some field experiences in nursing homes will be part of the course. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or above.

PSYC 154/254. Child Mental Health (4) A study of the causal factors related to the development of mental health problems in children, with an emphasis on the behavioral learning histories and cognitive behavioral patterns associated with specific disorders. Sociocultural contributions to mental health are also stressed. Behavioral and cognitive behavioral techniques are presented that are used to treat disorders commonly diagnosed in childhood. Students also learn strategies for communicating with children. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above.

PSYC 155/255. Couples and Family Therapy (4) An introduction to marital and family therapy theory and practice. Cognitive behaviorism is used as the foundation, and students also learn a broad systems perspective. Students are familiarized with the predominant family therapy styles in current use, as well as numerous family therapy strategies. Students take part in frequent role-play activities, acting the parts of families and family therapists. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above.

PSYC 156/256. Behavioral Medicine/Health Psychology (4) A survey class on the overlapping fields of behavioral medicine and healthy psychology, two of the fastest growing fields in contemporary psychology. Focuses on a biopsychosocial model of illness, how this model compares to a more traditional biomedical model of illness, and the applications of a biopsychosocial model to the treatment and prevention of chronic illnesses such as coronary heart disease, cancer, arthritis, AIDS/HIV, and stroke. Other topics include health promotion, chronic pain, the disease prone personality, medical compliance, and the doctor-patient relationship. Of interest to any student who aspires to become a health care professional in health psychology, clinical psychology, medicine, pharmacy, physical therapy, or nursing. Upper division standing recommended. Prerequisite: PSYC 053.

PSYC 158/258.Behavioral Assessment (4) An overview of behavioral assessment techniques. Specific topics to be covered include data collection, inter-observer agreement, social validity, treatment integrity, functional assessment, stimulus preference assessment, indirect assessment techniques, and psychometric assessment procedures. Prerequisite: PSYC 053.

PSYC 160/260. Behavior Analysis in Organizations (4) Covers the application of basic principles of behavior in business, industrial, and organizational settings. Student will learn to apply fundamental principles of behavior analysis to solve organizational problems such as training, safety, productivity, and quality deficits. In-depth examination of performance-based pay systems and participative/open-book management is also included. Prerequisite: PSYC 053.

PSYC 166. Psychology of Personality (4) Survey of contemporary personality theories and research. Focuses on the study of individual difference and how these differences are explained and measured using different personality assessment devices. Recommended for students aspiring to graduate study in clinical psychology, school psychology, marriage and family counseling, child development, or social work. Also of interest to those who want to learn more about themselves and the diversity of the species. Upper division standing recommended.

PSYC 167. Psychology and the Law (4) An examination of the role of psychology and psychologists in the judicial system. Topics include the selection of jurors, accuracy and impact of eyewitness testimony, biases of investigative and identification methods, insanity and competency to stand trial, hypnosis and lie detection, expert psychological testimony, effects of post-traumatic stress, abuse, and neglect, and predictions of dangerousness. Students will regularly attend actual trials in lieu of discussion periods.

PSYC 169. Social Psychology (4) A study of the interaction of social and psychological factors (how psychological factors affect group behavior and how social factors affect individual behavior). This course is primarily for psychology majors and is taught with an emphasis on research methods in social psychology. Prerequisite: MATH 035 or PSYC 103.

PSYC 183/283. Research Design (4) Design and analysis of research using single subjects and groups. Prerequisites: PSYC 105, and permission of the instructor.

PSYC 185A/185B. Psychology Clinic Internship (2) Clinic internship experience in the Pacific Psychology Clinic. Undergraduate psychology majors selected competitively work alongside Psychology graduate students doing clinical services (therapy, psychology/forensic testing, biofeedback, and behavioral assessment and intervention) under intensive supervision, with children and adults. Students must commit to enrolling in both fall and spring semesters. Prerequisite: Senior standing and permission of the instructor.

PSYC 191. Independent Study (2-4)

PSYC 193. Special Topics (1-4)

PSYC 195. Seminar (4)

PSYC 197. Independent Research (2 or 4)

PSYC 220. Clinical Neuropsychology (4) This course focuses on the relationship between human brain functioning and behavioral/ psychological functioning. The primary emphasis is on the diagnosis and treatment of brain dysfunction in humans. Methods of evaluating clients for the presence of various types of brain dysfunction using psychological testing are studied in depth, along with corresponding neuroanatomy and neuropathology. Research techniques for developing a clearer understanding of both normal and abnormal brain functioning is studied. Prerequisite: PSYC 109 or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 251. Behavioral Treatments/Applications (4) An overview of behavior therapy, behavior modification and cognitive social learning techniques for behavioral change and assessment. Interviewing skills, rapport building and ethical legal factors related to behavioral intervention are covered, as are current empirically validated treatments for various clinical disorders. Prerequisite: Open only to graduate students; by permission only.

PSYC 253. Supervising & Teaching Behavior Change (2) Introduces graduate students to the role of practicum supervisor and instructor. Under the supervision of the PSYC 053 course instructor, students develop, sustain, and evaluate their own interventions at preappoved externship sites. Students conduct bi-weekly discussion groups providing undergraduate students enrolled in PSYC 53 with additional resources for the course. Students meet weekly with the instructor to discuss practicum concerns and teaching responsibilities. Students gain practical experience carrying out independent research projects, which are often presented at research conferences, as well as teaching experience. All responsibilities are carried out under the supervision of the PSYC 053 instructor. Prerequisites: Open PSYC 251 and PSYC 258, OR extensive training in behavior analysis AND instructor approval.

PSYC 285 A,B,C,D Clinical Internship I, II, III, IV (1) Clinical experience in the University of the Pacific Psychology Clinic. Familiarization and practice in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of basic psychological tests, including intelligence tests for adults and preschoolers, projective tests, language scales, psychiatric scales, personality inventories and various behavior rating scales. Interviewing and testing skills with adults, adolescents, and children are refined. Intern assumes more responsibility in interviewing and administering psychological tests under supervision, and practices writing psychological evaluation reports. Interns are assigned psychotherapy cases under supervision. Prerequisite: Open only to graduate students; by permission only.

PSYC 285 E Behavior Analysis Internship I (1) Clinical experience with the University of the Pacific Behavior Analysis Services Program. This course includes practice in conducting behavioral interventions, designing, implementing, and monitoring behavior analysis programs for clients, overseeing the implementation of behavioral programs by others, attending behavioral program planning meetings, and reviewing program-relevant literature. Faculty and staff will observe interns engaging in activities in the natural environment at least once every two weeks, and provide specific feedback to interns on their performance. Multiple populations and sites will be available, including but not limited to, typically developing school-aged children in school and home settings, and individuals with psychiatric diagnoses and/or developmental disabilities in their homes or in community settings.

PSYC 285 F Behavior Analysis Internship II (1) A continuation of  PSYC 285 E. Clinical experience with the University of the Pacific Behavior Analysis Services Program. This course includes practice in conducting behavioral interventions, designing, implementing, and monitoring behavior analysis programs for clients, overseeing the implementation of behavioral programs by others, attending behavioral program planning meetings, and reviewing program-relevant literature. Faculty and staff will observe interns engaging in activities in the natural environment at least once every two weeks, and provide specific feedback to interns on their performance. Multiple populations and sites will be available, including but not limited to, typically developing school-aged children in school and home settings, and individuals with psychiatric diagnoses and/or developmental disabilities in their homes or in community settings

PSYC 291. Independent Graduate Study (2-4)

PSYC 293. Special Topics (1-4)

PSYC 295. Graduate Seminar in Psychology (4)

PSYC 297. Independent Graduate Research (2 or 4)

PSYC 299. Thesis (2 or 4)